Vega Sicilia Dinner & Spanish Wine Festival


This post is by Joseph and Curtis from Building Wine Cellars by Joseph and Curtis


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Join PJ Wine and Joseph & Curtis Custom Wine Cellars for two spectacular wine tasting events. PJ Wine, one of our friends, is sponsoring a couple exclusive wine events in mid-June that are sure to pique the interest of Spanish wine lovers.

If you don’t have many Spanish bottles in your wine cellars but have been meaning to expand your collection, we recommend getting in touch with PJ Wine.

PJ’s has built a nationally recognized reputation for its extensive Spanish wine selection. Named one of the best retailers in the country for Spanish wines by The Rosengarten Report, the PJ Wine team tastes thousands of Spanish wines every year. Their accumulated years of experience tasting and traveling to Spain allows the PJ Wine team to uncover and bring back the very best of Spain.

Vega Sicilia DinnerJune 17th

Here is a rare opportunity to drink 8 vintages …

Vega Sicilia Dinner & Spanish Wine Festival


This post is by Joseph and Curtis from Building Wine Cellars by Joseph and Curtis


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





Join PJ Wine and Joseph & Curtis Custom Wine Cellars for two spectacular wine tasting events. PJ Wine, one of our friends, is sponsoring a couple exclusive wine events in mid-June that are sure to pique the interest of Spanish wine lovers.

If you don’t have many Spanish bottles in your wine cellars but have been meaning to expand your collection, we recommend getting in touch with PJ Wine.

PJ’s has built a nationally recognized reputation for its extensive Spanish wine selection. Named one of the best retailers in the country for Spanish wines by The Rosengarten Report, the PJ Wine team tastes thousands of Spanish wines every year. Their accumulated years of experience tasting and traveling to Spain allows the PJ Wine team to uncover and bring back the very best of Spain.

Vega Sicilia DinnerJune 17th

Here is a rare opportunity to drink 8 vintages of Spain’s most lauded wine, Vega Sicilia, while dining at one of New York’s most prestigious restaurants, Daniel. More information

Spanish Wine Festival 2009June 18th

Join PJ Wine for this opportunity to celebrate and sample over 150 of the best Spanish wine selections available on the US market, paired with scrumptious Spanish cuisine. Every major wine region will be represented, including such classics as Rioja, Ribera del Duero, Priorat and Sherry, and hot emerging regions like Toro, Bierzo, Jumilla and more. More information

Thank you for stopping by, we are working on a couple new blogs about recent custom wine cellar projects, so stay tuned for more.

Cheers!

Review – Three Olives Root Beer Vodka

Citrus. Vanilla. Raspberry.  What do these have in common?  They are all flavors of vodka that most are familiar with and that large distillery’s typically don’t venture away from producing.  But what about root beer vodka?  Now that’s another story.  I’d never heard of root beer vodka before being sent a press sample from Three […]

$10 Tuesday: Taking the "Blah" Out of "Wine Blog"


This post is by Taster B from Smells Like Grape


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Right, so this week I was supposed to post that $9 Côtes du Ventoux I couldn’t face last week, but…oops! Somebody drank it all. (wasn’t me!) As I recall, it smelled like Grenache and tasted like grapefruit. If I were tasting it blind, I may have guessed it was a white wine. Well, Côtes du Ventoux is known for being a light red so, I guess this one was right on the money. I have nothing to compare it to though as I have not had another Côtes du Ventoux. At any rate, this particular bottle was not really my style. It seemed surprisingly flabby with food but, apparently it was quaffable (judging by the now empty bottle).

Meanwhile, one week and two days after TasteCamp East, I think I’m almost ready to open another bottle of wine! In all honesty, I think I got in over my head going to Long Island with a bunch of professional wine tasters. Okay, okay…only half of them were actual professional wine tasters in the sense that wine tasting is listed in their job description—the other half totally could be professionals though. One thing they all have in common: They all got chops!

Yep, I was spitting [almost] everything at TasteCamp but, I think the wine was somehow soaking into my bloodstream through my cheek tissue or something (I believe I’ve heard of that kind of thing happening). Anyway, I have spent the last week+ just trying to dry out. Rest assured people: I’m pretty sure I will drink wine again. I am merely unable to venture a guess as to when. Soon, I’m sure! But, on that note, I would like to announce a change to the $10 Tuesday format.

Life’s too short to drink cheap wine.

–Anonymous

…Cheap wine; bad wine; no matter how you phrase it, nobody wins from the Tasters A & B tossing the dice on a $10 bottle of wine and losing. It seems to me that there actually are a lot of pretty uninteresting wines available in the $10-and-under category and finding one that is worth mentioning is luck of the draw. Being as we don’t have the resources (or inclination) to taste through dozens of $10 wines every week in order to distill the field down to a weekly gem, $10 Tuesday will no longer be a weekly feature.

Worry not value-minded Reader: whenever we do run into a fun or interesting $10 wine, we’ll post a $10 Tuesday to let you know about it. I’m just not going to kill my liver trying to seek one out every single week. If you know of a producer or a region producing attention-worthy wines in the $10 price range, please feel free to pass your recommendations on to us. We’re always happy to find such values in wine. In the meantime, I’ve got a cellar full of 15-35 dollar wines that needs my attention. 😉

$10 Tuesday: Taking the “Blah” Out of “Wine Blog”


This post is by Taster B from Smells Like Grape


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Right, so this week I was supposed to post that $9 Côtes du Ventoux I couldn’t face last week, but…oops! Somebody drank it all. (wasn’t me!) As I recall, it smelled like Grenache and tasted like grapefruit. If I were tasting it blind, I may have guessed it was a white wine. Well, Côtes du Ventoux is known for being a light red so, I guess this one was right on the money. I have nothing to compare it to though as I have not had another Côtes du Ventoux. At any rate, this particular bottle was not really my style. It seemed surprisingly flabby with food but, apparently it was quaffable (judging by the now empty bottle).

Meanwhile, one week and two days after TasteCamp East, I think I’m almost ready to open another bottle of wine! In all honesty, I think I got in over my head going to Long Island with a bunch of professional wine tasters. Okay, okay…only half of them were actual professional wine tasters in the sense that wine tasting is listed in their job description—the other half totally could be professionals though. One thing they all have in common: They all got chops!

Yep, I was spitting [almost] everything at TasteCamp but, I think the wine was somehow soaking into my bloodstream through my cheek tissue or something (I believe I’ve heard of that kind of thing happening). Anyway, I have spent the last week+ just trying to dry out. Rest assured people: I’m pretty sure I will drink wine again. I am merely unable to venture a guess as to when. Soon, I’m sure! But, on that note, I would like to announce a change to the $10 Tuesday format.

Life’s too short to drink cheap wine.

–Anonymous

…Cheap wine; bad wine; no matter how you phrase it, nobody wins from the Tasters A & B tossing the dice on a $10 bottle of wine and losing. It seems to me that there actually are a lot of pretty uninteresting wines available in the $10-and-under category and finding one that is worth mentioning is luck of the draw. Being as we don’t have the resources (or inclination) to taste through dozens of $10 wines every week in order to distill the field down to a weekly gem, $10 Tuesday will no longer be a weekly feature.

Worry not value-minded Reader: whenever we do run into a fun or interesting $10 wine, we’ll post a $10 Tuesday to let you know about it. I’m just not going to kill my liver trying to seek one out every single week. If you know of a producer or a region producing attention-worthy wines in the $10 price range, please feel free to pass your recommendations on to us. We’re always happy to find such values in wine. In the meantime, I’ve got a cellar full of 15-35 dollar wines that needs my attention. 😉

Review: Four – The Premium Wine Tube

You’ve heard it all of your life, “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” And most likely, as you’ve applied that principal throughout your life, you’ve realized it really is good advice. That Pad Kee Mao you wouldn’t have touched a few years ago? It’s now become something you crave ever since you […]

Drinking Champagne $$$$!


This post is by Wine Yoda from Wine Yoda


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The Iron Chevsky posted a question recently, “what’s the most expensive Champagne you’ve ever had.” I’ve drank some pretty good Champagnes in my life but I’ve never thought about them in terms of dollar value. So this question made me reflect. Surely, a bottle with “Krug” on the label has to be the most expensive. But which one? I’ve had some vintages of the Clos du Mesnil (1986, 1988, and 1990 come to mind) but I haven’t been lucky enough to try the Clos d’Ambonnay, which at around $3,500 or so for a bottle is the most expensive Krug Champagne made. Notwithstanding this glaring shortcoming, I’ve had a Krug that is at least as expensive as the Clos d’Ambonnay, a magnum of the 1971 Krug Collection.

Krug Collection are bottles and magnums of vintage Krug that are kept since bottling in the Krug cellars and gradually released decades later. Though they are identical to the vintage bottling, the passage of time in the cold, quiet comfort of the Krug cellars make them take a unique path of evolution and provenance.

About fifteen years ago, at the end of 1993, I was leaving for another job and as a farewell my colleagues treated me to the magnum of 1971 Krug Collection suitably accompanied by jars of beluga and ossetra caviar. My leaving provided a great excuse to have a good year-end office party, and since we all got paid a bonus, why not the best Champagne?

I remember the Krug being more wine than Champagne, there were hardly any bubbles left and the color was deep yellow straw with aromas of hops and citrus. It was more akin to grand cru Chablis or to Montrachet–very mineral, and quite dry and austere. The salty, oily, and nutty taste of the caviar fitted the Krug perfectly.

To purchase the 1971 Krug Collection today would set you back about $2,000 for a bottle and probably about $5,000 or more for a magnum. It is a rare Champagne and the price surely reflects that. Since then I’ve never gotten together with any of my old friends who shared that magnum with me, nor have I had another Krug Collection. I thought the rarity of the occasion more than matched the Champagne.

Kinkead Ridge Estate Winery


This post is by WineCompass from Wine Compass Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




We received a press release from Kinkead Ridge Estate Winery stating that the winery plans to re-open this Memorial Weekend and it reminded us of the devastation inflicted by the 2008 Easter frost. The frost damaged vineyards from North Carolina through the Midwest into Missouri. During that weekend, Kinkead Ridge lost 90% of their white grapes. For a winery that produces wine from primarily estate grown fruit, its no surprise that they had to close the winery last summer. This press release is also a helpful reminder to support our local wineries – so, go out and drink local wine.

Full press release:

“Owners Ron Barrett and Nancy Bentley will re-open Kinkead Ridge winery to the public on Memorial Day weekend, May 23 and May 25, for the release of the 2008 white wines: Viognier/Roussanne, Revelation, Riesling and Traminette. The winery will also be open on summer Saturdays through Labor Day weekend, when Kinkead Ridge will release its 2007 red wines. The winery was closed last summer due to an Easter frost that decimated 90% of the white wine grapes. Also available is the 2006 River Village Cellars Cabernet Franc, which won a silver medal at the Finger Lakes International Wine Competition.

Kinkead Ridge recently purchased a building in downtown Ripley, with the hope of turning it into a tasting room when Ohio passes the necessary legislation. Until then, the winery will continue to welcome the public to the winery at 904 Hamburg Street, 3 blocks behind McDonalds, east of downtown. See www.KinkeadRidge.com for details.

Southern Ohio is now home to several wineries, including Harmony Hill in Bethel, and other wineries will open within the next year, including Renascent Vineyards in Georgetown.”

Steven Spurrier Tastes Veramar Wines

I mentioned Virginia wines are going to be represented at the London International Wine Fair. This is, obviously, a really big deal and the wineries owners I’ve talked to are naturally excited.But, it is not just Virginia winemakers who are excited, it seems the international community is excited as well. Check out what Steven Spurrier said about Veramar wines:Veramar Vineyards 2007 Chardonnay:

The “Grey House” Garden, Part 2: Arugula


This post is by Nicki Sizemore from Organic Wine Journal


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garden1 garden2 garden3 garden4

It worked. Seeds were planted. They sprouted. And today, the novice gardener ate her first pick of the season.

OK, for many of you out there, this is far less than a miracle. After all, humans have been growing food for around 12,000 years. But remember, I’m a child of the iceberg-in-plastic generation. For me, this is thrilling.

So far, the garden has been much easier than we thought it would be: plant seeds; give them water; watch them grow. However, my husband and I have made our share of mistakes. We accidentally ordered bright red—I’m talking screaming-scarlet—mulch for the aisles. Therefore, instead of the organic-hued rows we envisioned, we’re left with racing stripes. Worse, however, is that the spot we chose for the plot—right next to the house—doesn’t receive nearly as much full sunlight as we had thought (we fear the spinach might never make it past infancy). Oops.

Today, however, I’m feeling optimistic (and who doesn’t love baby spinach, anyway?). I just ate an unforgettable salad of freshly snipped arugula leaves tossed with a buttermilk and herb dressing. Delicate and sweet, peppery yet cool—nothing could taste finer.

I suspect that the salad would taste good even with grocery store or farmer’s market arugula. But, if you haven’t ever done so, try growing your own. You’ll see what I mean.

arugula-salad
Arugula Salad with Buttermilk & Herb Dressing

This makes plenty of dressing, which can be used throughout the week if kept in a jar in the fridge (it also makes for a great marinade for poultry). For a smaller serving, cut the recipe in half.

  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons champagne or white wine vinegar
  • 2 teaspooons honey
  • 2 garlic clove, smashed to a paste (or passed through garlic press)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh mint
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh marjoram or basil
  • 2 tablespoons good quality extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 bunch arugula
  1. Whisk together all of the ingredients in a small bowl. Cover and let sit or 10 minutes at room temperature, or for up to 4 days in the refrigerator.
  2. Drizzle the dressing (you won’t need it all) over the arugula and serve immediately.

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Blue Fin special in aisle 2


This post is by Ryan from oe•no•phile


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Blue Fin California Chardonnay (2008)
Blue Fin Winery
Chardonnay
Napa, California

Today while picking up some lunch items at Trader Joe’s, I decided to check out a couple of their current wine specials. The store, well-known for Two Buck Chuck – now faniced up under the Charles Shaw name and priced at $3.49 a bottle – commonly stocks new products at great prices which are only available for short periods. A current special are a couple wines from Blue Fin Winery, priced very reasonably at only $4.99 a bottle.

Both a Chardonnay and Pinot Noir were displayed, so I grabbed a bottle of each. Even if they weren’t any good I figured I’d only be out $10 – not a bad deal. I chilled the Chard and had some dinner before sitting down to sample each. Here are my notes.

Appearance: Clear, pale, light golden yellow in color.

Nose: Clean, with youthful aromas. Just shy of medium intensity, fruit balanced well with oak. Yellow apple, lemon, melon, nectarine, and stone fruit. Buttery and biscuit notes soften the citrus.

Palate: Dry with medium acidity that sneaks up on the finish, peaking sharply, but then smoothing out. Very slight tannin from oak, medium alcohol, and slightly fuller than medium bodied. Flavors include citrus, pear, apple, and stone fruit. Smooth body and grapefruit and butter on the finish.

I am not a fan of California-style Chardonnays – I definitely prefer my whites to have little if no influence of oak, and to express more of their fruit.

I have to say though that the Blue Fin was quite enjoyable. The oak was definitely present, but was very nice balanced with the fruit characteristics. I was also surprised by the acidity that sneaks up on the back-end – surprised, but pleased. The body of the wine was full enough to pair well with food, but I’m perfectly happy sipping this wine on its own. Sure there might be other more interesting white grapes being made into wine, but you really can’t replace a well-made Chardonnay.

Blue Fin California Pinot Noir (2008)
Blue Fin Winery
Chardonnay
Napa, Pinot Noir

Appearance: Clear and bright, not pale but very light – text is clearly visible. The color is intensely purple to ruby red.

Nose: Clean and youthful, but very muted. Fruit dominated – despite it’s softness – with cranberry, cherry, strawberry, and raspberry. Very light hints of oak with some vanilla and spice.

Palate: Dry with moderate acidity. Light in body and tannin. Flavors are similar to the nose, and a little bland. Cedar, cherry, and apple. There is no presence of earth or intense fruit. Drinkable but not interesting.

Quite a disappointment after enjoying the Chardonnay. The simplicity of this bottle makes it palatable, but I don’t really care for it. My marker for American Pinot Noir is always the presence of intense fruit. European PN (Burgundy in particular) is more characeristic of vegetal, mushroom, and earthy tones. I enjoy both, mood depending, but the Blue Fin sadly fell short.

Overall enjoying one of two wines at such low prices I don’t see as such a bad thing. I would have loved having 2 for 2, but you can’t have everything, right? Unfortunately there’s not much information on Blue Fin available online – that Google seems to be able to uncover – so I don’t have a website to check. I do believe that Trader Joe’s carries a couple of their other wines – at very slightly higher prices. If there’s a store near you I’d recommend checking any of them out. You might find a great deal!

Cheers!

An Awesome Blogger Needs Our Support.


This post is by Taster B from Smells Like Grape


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




My friend Hardy is going for the brass ring and he needs your help! If you have 2 minutes to spare, please watch his application video and vote for him in the “A Really Goode Job” competition to fill a six month Murphy-Goode Wine Country Lifestyle Correspondent contract.

Hardy is the man behind Dirty South Wine and is one of the most original, PR-savvy, creative wine bloggers I’ve met. I want him to get this job. I’m gonna be straight with you: I’ll probably be a little jealous when he gets it but, really, I can’t think of a better candidate. Won’t you vote for Hardy? He’s hilarious–and it’s good karma!

A link to the voting is available from the “Dirty for Goode” badge on the right!

An Awesome Blogger Needs Our Support.


This post is by Taster B from Smells Like Grape


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




My friend Hardy is going for the brass ring and he needs your help! If you have 2 minutes to spare, please watch his application video and vote for him in the “A Really Goode Job” competition to fill a six month Murphy-Goode Wine Country Lifestyle Correspondent contract.

Hardy is the man behind Dirty South Wine and is one of the most original, PR-savvy, creative wine bloggers I’ve met. I want him to get this job. I’m gonna be straight with you: I’ll probably be a little jealous when he gets it but, really, I can’t think of a better candidate. Won’t you vote for Hardy? He’s hilarious–and it’s good karma!

A link to the voting is available from the “Dirty for Goode” badge on the right!

Wine Tours through Historic Virginia


This post is by WineAdventurer from What's on my Mind - Virginia Wine!


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I have just read the article “Wine Tours through Historic Virginia” in the summer issue of “Essentially America”, UK’s leading consumer magazine dedicated to travel and lifestyle in the USA and Canada. It chronicles a trip we organized for Mary Moore Mason, the Editor of Essentially America. It is a fantastic article that captures the essence of the Virginia ‘wine lifestyle’

Book Review: “California Wine for Dummies”


This post is by WineCompass from Wine Compass Blog


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We recently received a copy of California Wine For Dummies and after reading it, found that it is a great resource for both novices and self proclaimed experts. Part I introduces California wines to the reader by briefly describing the history of wine making in the state, the wine regions, the grape varieties used, and how to decipher the label. These topics are worthwhile for the reader particularly during the discussion regarding the differences between “varieties” and “varietals” as well as “estate bottled”and “estate grown”.

However, parts II through IV were the useful for us. Instead of focusing on the wine region, the authors focus on each grape variety and then discuss in which regions they are grown and how they differ depending upon that region. Particularly why wines made from the same grape may differ depending on the temperature variation between regions. They also list their favorite wines made from each variety as well as why wineries may blend certain grapes. Great information.

In between they offer interesting information such as Wente Vineyards Estate Winery being the first vineyard to plant Chardonnay in California and why Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon are blended. And not only do they discuss the major grapes (Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, and Zinfandel), but they discuss other grapes such as Petite Sirah, all the Rhone varieties, the other Bordeaux grapes, Tempranillo, Tannat, and even Napa Gamay (Valdiguie). Sparkling and dessert wines are also included. It was nice to see that
Ridge Vineyards was noted a few times particularly how they blend their Zinfandel as well as our favorite Petite Sirah from Foppiano Vineyards.

This book would also serve as a nice companion on a wine touring trip to California. The authors discuss some of the towns in the major regions, suggest places to stay and wineries to visit. The final chapters actually discuss what to expect when visiting a California tasting room and special attractions and excursions.

Like we said previously, we highly recommend this book from novices to self proclaimed experts. Its also an easy read. One of us finished the book during a 2 1/2 hour plane ride and the other during a short afternoon on the beach. We will also be seeking out the earlier release: Wine For DummiesWine For Dummies

DC Brane Cantenac Wine Dinner

Remember three posts again when I said I would stop talking about Brane. I lied :).It turns out the Brane Cantenac winemaker will be hosting a wine dinner at Petit Plats in Woodley Park on Monday the 11th. Details are here.I’ll be there!

Portland Trip Part 2

As I said before I didn’t have much time for wine tasting while I was in Portland. Since I could not go to the wineries, I thought it would be nice to bring them to me. Fortunately, less than two blocks from my hotel was Oregon Wines on Broadway!Oregon Wines on Broadway is a great wine bar that specializes in wine from the Northwest. They have a great selection, though one that is heavily

The silence of the drams


This post is by Sharon from Sharon's Wine Blog


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post





I have had so many memorable wines of late that I have felt somehow cornered into silence. How to choose! How to talk about them!

But it’s important to talk about them, of course – to get their texture and weave, to remember that morning you woke up with a curious aftertaste of 1983 Domaine de Chevalier Graves on your palate and puzzled over its gorgeous gravel before falling back to sleep for a little.

Or how you chased down a snappy NV Pierre Peters with a thick, heady pour of 2003 Radikon Jakot while stabbing bread into a dish of olive oil.

Or the awesome, yeasty surprise of 2000 Lassaigne Blanc de Blancs Brut Nature, which wore zero dosage with mastery and beckoned, and beckoned, and beckoned to have more of itself poured into your glass.

I want to talk about all of those things. The 2007 Dashe L’Enfant Terrible, still as nervy and peculiar and succulent as ever. The 2006 Lapierre Morgon with its silky langorousness swirling through the tastebuds. The 1998 López de Heredia Tondonia Rosado that starts out oxidized and then tightens into a dazzling burst of fruit and flowers. The floozily sappy 2006 Richaud Cairanne, the exquisite, tangled and complex 2005 Texier Châteauneuf-du-Pape Blanc and crackling NV Peillot Montaigneux Brut.

Not writing about them creates the danger of forgetting them. And these are wines I don’t want to forget.

Diego Curtaz


This post is by Italian Wine Blog from Italian Wine Blog - Wine90


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Diego Curtaz

The vineyards of Diego Curtaz lie in the north west corner of Italy in the Valle d’Aosta, a region growing in stature thanks to small producers like Diego Curtaz and the award winning style of the Valle d’Aosta’s standard bearer at “Les Crêtes“. 2007 was a decent vintage in this tiny parcel of Italy, in the Italian Alps and due north of the mighty Piedmont, the Valle d’Aosta shares little with its formidable neighbour, not even the grapes make it up the steep slopes to Europe’s highest growing region aside from the sturdy Dolcetto. Here you will find Petit Rouge and Gamay rule supreme in the land of VdA reds.



An industrious lot, the winemakers of the Valle d’Aosta are not shy in trying their luck with a multitude of grapes and they even plant Syrah in them there hills. Today I tried three wines from Diego Curtaz, a sumptious Gamay, a complex and terroir typical Torrette and a Petit Rouge that hit me upside the head with age-old Asparagus notes that I can’t forget even though I’m really trying.

Diego Curtaz Valle d’Aosta Torrette DOC 2007BUY – €6.50
Mid ruby red, aromatically explosive with huge chunks of cherry, a black pepper note as well as a strong showing of strawberry. The wine is light bodied, low tannins and high acidity, the wine blend is complimentary and interesting leaving the impression on the finish of a well mixed cherry cordial (!!!), alcohol well ingrained. Above average and interesting. 86 Points

Diego Curtaz Gamay 2007BUY – €6.50
Mid ruby red with candied cherry notes, hints of violet and banana, looking like Beaujolais Nouveau until the palate which is of a high quality. Great acidity, fruity and vibrant on the palate with a shockingly decent finish. Are we in Morgon? 88 Points

Diego Curtaz Petit Rouge 2007PASS – €6.50
Mid ruby red with a similar profile on the nose to the Torrette with cherry, pepper and strawberries but the wine falls apart on the palate turning vegetal and plain strange, poorly balanced, uninteresting flavours and a finish that’s going nowhere. 72 Points

Where can I buy this wine?
All wines available at The Cellar Door

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72 Points is one of the worst wines of the year. What has been your worst wine experience this year?

Review: Drop Dead Red

Wine: Hip CHICKS do Wine Drop Dead RedReview: I won’t lie, the thing that initially intrigued me about this wine was the label. The label was designed by a local artist who specialized in pulp fiction book covers. His work graces the bottles of this wine and the Wine Bunny Rouge. The label is intriguing because it plays up on the intrigue and danger and associates it with the wine (and, well,