Bouchard Corton-Charlemagne 2007


This post is by Edward from Wino sapien


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Chardonnay. 13.5%. Diam. Cellar.

I long for BC (before covid) and dream about AC (after covid) while drifting in-between. . . interstitial time. . . each day a blur, it seems like we have been living with social restrictions for much longer. . . I think it’s only a week since restaurants and cafes closed. . . no wonder prisoners count the days with marks on the wall. . .

Like my neighbours, I’ve been walking in circles around the park, while discretely keeping 1.5 metres away from all humans and their dogs. . . one welcome side effect of COVID19 is likely to be slimmer waistlines.

The local liquor barns have been limiting alcohol purchases to 3 bottles per day. . . I’ve been raiding my cellar instead.

A half bottle, the liquid soft and golden. Stone and peach and white pepper on the nose, butter milk. Expressive, but quieter than I had expected. Bronzed, nutty and slightly sweet to open, …

Wine of the Day, No. 568


This post is by Fredric Koeppel from Bigger Than Your Head


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




While the rosé wines of harvest 2019 are beginning to tickle in, don’t forget that many rosés from 2018 are still drinking beautifully. Among them is the Chateau de Berne “Romance” 2018, designated Méditerranée IGP, a vast area that covers most of Provence, the Bouches-du-Rhône and Corsica. Predominantly grenache (45 percent) and cinsault (25 percent), with dollops of syrah and merlot (15 percent each), the Berne “Romance” 2018 is one of the palest rosés I have encountered, offering just a tinge of melon pink in the glass; aromas of melon and strawberry, with a touch of rose petals and lilac, are subtle, even ethereal; that ethereal character continues on the palate, where the wine flows like gauze energized by brisk acidity; give this a few moments and it conjures a lovely, tender melange of lavender, graphite, thyme, dried cherries and talc, all tied together by a burgeoning element of damp …

Domaine De L’Arlot Clos Des Forets Saint Georges 2009


This post is by Edward from Wino sapien


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




13.5%. Nuits Saint Georges. Cork. Cellar.

The 2005 was paired with a porcine pink erase, this bottle – a Huon pine wombat picked up from the Salamanca street markets before the walls came up. . .

Ever rewarding and ever wonderful Domaine De L’Arlot. . . Deep and freshly scented; to open – something pure, lush and beautiful. At first stem and curry leaf, later earth and roots and eventually black cardamon. Correctly weighted and warm. Fine but firm tannins – an earthy and expansive tail.

G. Descombes Brouilly 2013


This post is by Edward from Wino sapien


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




An old, but contextually apt photo. I opened the bottle of Beaujolais to settle my nerves after a dryish fortnight during which we were hosting an French exchange student and worrying and so far just reading about SARS-COV2. We’ve never before bought and gone through so much cheese, salami and white bread. . . The lad will not look at a raw vegetable. . .

The wine, a thing of great beauty, was like a time machine, transporting me back to Paris and our last meal there. . . a terrific nose – playful and bright, clean and pure; berries and easier times. Slippery in the mouth, a simple pleasure and much needed distraction.

2 years ago.

An Interview With Author Wink Lorch + A Savoie Wine Pairing


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Chigin Crédit Photo CIVS & Laurent Madelon.jpg

A view of Chigin vineyards. Photo Credit: Vin de Savoie | Laurent Madelon

This month on L’Occasion, I have the honor of hosting our Wine Pairing Weekend event which gathers wine, food and travel writers to cover the pleasures of a chosen region or category.

The topic I chose to explore is Savoie, in eastern France, situated south of Lake Geneva in a mountainous area on the Swiss border. Don’t kick yourself if you haven’t sampled many wines from Savoie, which only produces a minuscule 0.55% of all appellated French wines. Winegrowers from the four appellations here cultivate 20+ grape varieties to promote predominately white wine, which accounts for 70%. 20% is red and the remaining 10% is split between rosé and sparkling.

I’ve been to Lake Geneva as a wayward deviation from a road trip from Burgundy to Provence, but I didn’t get to immerse myself in …

wine writer, wine books, Savoie
Carte Vignoble Crédit Photo Cartagène.jpg
Apremont 2.jpg

Moët & Chandon, Vintage 2012


This post is by Fredric Koeppel from Bigger Than Your Head


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Champagne house of Moët began in 1743, established by wine trader Claude Moët. In 1833, a partner joined the firm, and it became Moët & Chandon. The next transformational changes occurred in 1971, when Moët & Chandon merged with Hennessy Cognac and then in 1987 with Louis Vuitton to create — you guessed it — LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, the world’s largest luxury company. It says something about an entity’s longevity and consistency when its most popular brand, the Brut Imperial, was introduced in the 1860s. Most Champagne houses have a grand marque, a Tête de Cuvée, as in Louis Roederer’s Cristal, Taittinger’s Comtes de Champagne and Veuve Clicquot’s La Grande Dame. Moët & Chandon’s top-of-the-line is the famous Dom Perignon, the first vintage of which was produced in 1921 but not released until 1936.

Today, we look at two of Moët & Chandon’s vintage products, the Grand …

Your Ticket To French Wine Is Actually A Map


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Map of France

I’ve always been into wine. But it was French wine that turned “into” = a career writing about wine. And I’m not French.

But I was writing a novel (I’ve been a fiction writer for 15 years) about winemakers in Provence (stop me if you’ve heard this!) and I’d figured out the basics about the region from reading. Seriously, reading. I hadn’t tasted much wine from Provence at all. This was before Provençal rosé had a strong presence in the U.S. market and there wasn’t much of it being served. I’d gotten a bit obsessed with the culture and history and from there it led naturally, into wine. (At the time, I’d say Spanish wine was probably my favorite, so I wasn’t even coming from a very French place, wine-wise.)

Coteaux des Travers, Dentelles de Montmirail, Southern Rhone

A view of Rasteau from the elevated vineyards of Domaine des Coteaux des Travers. Credit: Jill Barth

Les Baux de Provence Vineyards
French Wine Basics

Champagne Jacques Copin


This post is by Terry from Wine Trail Traveler LLC


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




January marks the time of our annual first wine tasting in Washington DC. The first wine event of the year is sponsored by APVSA – Association pour la Promotion des Vins et Spiritueux en Amérique du Nord (the Association for the Promotion of Wine and Spirits in North America). The  team at APVSA is led by Pascal Fernand, who helps client wineries and distilleries find distributors in North America. The three-week tour, if producers attend all the events, covers the United States, Mexico and Canada.

Mathieu Copin of Champagne Jacques Copin

I tend to visit champagne producers at this event. My first stop was Champagne Jacques Copin where I met Mathieu Copin who previously answered several questions via email. 

WTT: What are your most enjoyable aspects of winemaking/vineyard?Mathieu Copin: Harvest because it’s the result of a year of work . 

WTT: How many hectares/acres of grapes are you …

Hop On The Train To Savoie. Preview of #WinePW Trip To France


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




French wine, Savoie wine, Alpine Wine

Photo Credit: Vin de Savoie

Hey hey friends and readers! On Saturday, February 8, 2020, I am hosting Wine Pairing Weekend in my virtual salon, right here on L’Occasion. We’ll be visiting the French food and wine region of Savoie. Here’s a teaser:

  • Savoie is located in eastern France, south of Lake Geneva in a mountainous area on the Swiss border.
  • Savoie Wines represent a minuscule 0.55% of all appellated French wines.
  • 20+ grape varieties grow here.
  • 70% of the production is white wine, 20% is red and the remaining 10% is split between rosé and sparkling.
  • In Savoie, there are 27 vineyards certified AB organic or in conversion to organic.
  • There are four AOPs in Savoie.

If you are a writer or reader ready to share in the bounty of food and wine from France’s Alpine region then consider yourself invited to join the discussion.

French wine, mountain wine, Alpine Wine

Photo Credit: Vin …

Wine of the Day, No. 549


This post is by Fredric Koeppel from Bigger Than Your Head


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Champagne Boizel Brut Reserve is a blend of 55 percent pinot noir, 30 percent chardonnay and 15 percent pinot meunier, aged three years in bottle on the lees. The negociant house was founded in 1834 and is still owned and operated by the family; winemakers are Evelyne Boizel and Christophe Rogues. The color is very pale blond-gold, animated by a swirling surge of tiny silver bubbles; it offers a tendril-like bouquet of pears and quince, limestone and roasted lemon, with notes of green tea, acacia flower and brioche in the background; there’s real presence on the palate, a scintillating balance among bright lip-smacking acidity, a texture both dense and weightless, spare and elegant stone-fruit flavors, and a chiseled structure of damp flint and shale that feels almost transparent; the finish is dry and sleek, a fleeting melange of bracing salinity and seashell delicacy. 12 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $50, …

Wine of the Day, No. 549


This post is by Fredric Koeppel from Bigger Than Your Head


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Champagne Boizel Brut Reserve is a blend of 55 percent pinot noir, 30 percent chardonnay and 15 percent pinot meunier, aged three years in bottle on the lees. The negociant house was founded in 1834 and is still owned and operated by the family; winemakers are Evelyne Boizel and Christophe Rogues. The color is very pale blond-gold, animated by a swirling surge of tiny silver bubbles; it offers a tendril-like bouquet of pears and quince, limestone and roasted lemon, with notes of green tea, acacia flower and brioche in the background; there’s real presence on the palate, a scintillating balance among bright lip-smacking acidity, a texture both dense and weightless, spare and elegant stone-fruit flavors, and a chiseled structure of damp flint and shale that feels almost transparent; the finish is dry and sleek, a fleeting melange of bracing salinity and seashell delicacy. 12 percent alcohol. Excellent. About $50, …

30 Great Wine Bargains of 2019


This post is by Fredric Koeppel from Bigger Than Your Head


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




______________________________________________________________________

In a sense, the “30 Great Wine Bargains of 2019” is more instructive that the “50 Great Wines of 2019” that I posted a few days ago. The latter is a proposition for dreaming; the former is about realistic goals and purchasing. Prices range from $10 to $20. The proportion is two sparkling wines (both Cava but different styles); three rosé wines (also of different styles); 16 whites and nine reds. Geographically, the breadth includes California (8), Italy (5), France and Spain (3 each), Oregon and South Africa (2 each), and Argentina, Austria, Chile, Germany, New Zealand, Portugal and Slovenia (1 each). Call us diverse, here at BTYH! Looking at this roster, I can’t help thinking what a great and reasonably-priced list this would make for restaurants and by-the-glass programs. Anyway, enjoy, in moderation, of course.

These wines were generally samples for review.

___________________________________________________________________

Aia Vecchia Vermentino 2017, Toscana, …

Southwest France: A Pool of Grape Diversity


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




img_1918

How many grape varieties can you name? A handful, right off the bat, I’m sure. Then there’s probably another dozen or so that come to mind when you start thinking, maybe two dozen. Unless you spend your time learning about grape diversity (which I know some of my readers do) you may be hard pressed to list 50 or 100 grape varieties. 

I’ve read estimates that there are 10,000+ grape varieties in the world, including 1,400 known wine grape varieties. According to Napa Valley Vintners, 34 varieties are grown there. Significantly more diverse is Lodi, which supports over 100 varieties. There are your benchmarks.

If grape diversity is your thing, you may want to spread out a bit, like all the way to Southwest (Sud-Ouest) France. Southwest France is located south of Bordeaux, between the Pyrénées Mountains and Spain. The region’s west coast hits the Atlantic Ocean. It’s …

Southwest France vineyards, historic vineyards, indigenous French grapes, Godforsaken Grapes

50 Great Wines of 2019


This post is by Fredric Koeppel from Bigger Than Your Head


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The annual “50 Great Wines” of the just completed previous year is a project I look forward to each January. It gives me the opportunity to share with My Readers the favorite wines I tasted or rather shamelessly consumed during that time. Remember, though, this is not a list of the “greatest” wines available in 2019 or the “best” or “most exciting” in the world. I don’t encounter enough wines to make that sort of assessment. These 50 selections are, however, the ones that, within the range of wine I tasted, struck my nose and palate and memory as particularly evocative and expressive.

California, the state from which I receive most of my samples, dominates this list. In fact, 31 of the wines were made in the Golden State, followed by France (6), Italy (5), Oregon (3), Germany (2), and one each from Australia, Portugal and New York state. The …

Wine of the Day, No. 548


This post is by Fredric Koeppel from Bigger Than Your Head


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The house of André Jacquart is now in its fifth generation of the family, with winemaker Marie Doyard. This is a “grower house,” that is, the Champagnes are made from their own estate vineyards. Champagne André Jacquart “Vertus Experience” Blanc de Blancs Extra Brut is 100 percent chardonnay from Premier Cru vineyards, aged four years in the bottle on the lees (en tirage). This is a Champagne of immense tone and presence on the palate. The color is pale straw-gold, the tiny bubbles a constant surging fountain; the bouquet presents a welter of acacia flower and almond blossom, lime peel with a hint of grapefruit, notes of spiced pear, buttered toast and damp limestone; this is notably lithe, crisp and lively, with crystalline layers of limestone and chalk that lend a sense of fine-meshed density; saline and smoky on the finish. 12 percent alcohol. It’s not cheap, but …

Weekend Wine Notes: 10 Under $20


This post is by Fredric Koeppel from Bigger Than Your Head


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Yes, another eclectic and diverse line-up for the Weekend Wine Notes, but the important point is the price range — from $12 to $20. Three whites, one rosé, six reds. I won’t say that there’s a wine in this post for every taste, but I bet it comes damned close. Enjoy! (In moderation, please.) I would say, by the way, that all of these examples would make great entries in restaurant and bar by-the-glass programs.

These wines were samples for review.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

buisse

Domaine Paul Buisse Sauvignon 2018, Touraine, Loire Valley, France. 13% alc. 100% sauvignon blanc. Very pale straw-gold hue; incredibly pretty wine — lime peel, grapefruit and jasmine; hints of ginger and quince; lovely talc-like texture riven by bracing acidity; very dry, a touch of ripe peach, finishes with layers of limestone and flint minerality. Now through the Summer of 2020. Very Good+. About $13, often discounted to …

Etic PECORINO
4599-88.pdf
RyderEstate_FrontLabel_2018_PNRose_transp
vino-borri
Caldora-Montepulciano-DAbruzzo-Front-label-300x294
Famiglia_FW_Malbec_trans
PAGOS DEL GALIR _MENCÍA
Peyrassol-VDP-Portes-dela-Mediterranee-pt-1
nanfre_front_label

The Winemaker’s Wife by Kristin Harmel + Champagne!


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




img_1605

When I got the opportunity to read The Winemaker’s Wife by Kristin Harmel, I knew it was a book for which I could make time. Her subject matter—French vineyards and winemakers during World War II—is one that I share in my own body of work, having written a novel about the same time period based in the south of France.

Harmel has chosen Champagne 1940 as her setting, and she balances methods and tradition with the constantly changing face of family life and relationships. She moves the story into a modern dimension through the voice of a new generation poised to discover the past from 2019 New York. Her writing hits a satisfying point between researched accuracy and the touch of the human experience.

According to Harmel’s website: “Her latest novel, The Winemaker’s Wife, a World War II tale of love, family, and betrayal set in the rolling …

img_1604
Port 8.jpg