Le Grappin ‘Les Grèves’ 2012


This post is by Edward from Wino sapien


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Beaune, 13%, Diam, Cellar.

This seem to have moved very little since my last encounter, though I concede it’s more complex and I’m more impressed this time around. . . It seems very fresh and bright, befitting of the seal and the over the top cellaring (4 degrees C for the last 5 years). . . stones and peach, citrus oil/curry leaf, marzipan and butterscotch. Flesh and zip, fatty and lush in the mouth, frontal but with lovely length and poise. A treat. 17.5 – 18/20

Wine of the Day, No. 502


This post is by Fredric Koeppel from Bigger Than Your Head


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Chateau Cap Leon Veyrin stands in isolation at the northern border of the Listrac-Medoc appellation. Situated far inland of the D2 road that runs through the premier regions known for the top-rated and famous estates, Listrac-Medoc is a slightly hilly area — as hilly as it gets in Bordeaux — of forests and vineyards that grow on well-drained layers of gravel soil. The estate dates back to 1810; it was acquired by the Meyre family in 1908. Current owner is Alain Meyre. The vineyard is planted to about 55 percent merlot, 40 percent cabernet sauvignon and 5 percent petit verdot. The unpretentious chateau is available for guests. The estate of 32 hectares — about 79 acres — is classified as Cru Bourgeois. Chateau Cap Leon Veyrin 2015 is a blend of 57 percent merlot, 40 percent cabernet sauvignon and 3 percent petit verdot, aged 12 months in oak, 25 percent …

A Name To Know: Gérard Bertrand


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


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When I visited the Languedoc for the first time, it was with the name Gérard Bertrand fresh in my mind.

I’d had the opportunity to read about Bertrand’s work and my friend had mentioned, more than once, the outstanding Festival de Jazz à l’Hospitalet that happens on the property each July.

As a writer with a biodynamics beat, Bertrand was on my radar as a leader in the field. Bertrand’s network includes Cigalus, the Aigle Estate, the Clos du Temple, Château La Sauvageonne, Château l’Hospitalet, Château des Karantes, Château Tarailhan, Château Aigues Vives, Château des Deux Rocs and Château de la Soujeole — all in compliance with Demeter Biodynamic® Farm and Processing Standards.

Bertrand has significant reach a stone’s throw from major hotspots in Herault and Aude: Carcassonne, Narbonne and Montpellier. Esteemed appellations such as Limoux, Corbiers and Minervois are represented by Gérard Bertrand releases.

Carcassonne, Narbonne, wine, Corbiers, Terrasses du Larzac, Montpellier, Minervois
French food and wine pairings, grilled food and white wine
sud de france wine. Languedoc wine, organic wine

A Name To Know: Gérard Bertrand


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Languedoc white wine, biodynamic French wine
Photo Credit: Jill Barth

When I visited the Languedoc for the first time, it was with the name Gérard Bertrand fresh in my mind.

I’d had the opportunity to read about Bertrand’s work and my friend had mentioned, more than once, the outstanding Festival de Jazz à l’Hospitalet that happens on the property each July.

As a writer with a biodynamics beat, Bertrand was on my radar as a leader in the field. Bertrand’s network includes Cigalus, the Aigle Estate, the Clos du Temple, Château La Sauvageonne, Château l’Hospitalet, Château des Karantes, Château Tarailhan, Château Aigues Vives, Château des Deux Rocs and Château de la Soujeole — all in compliance with Demeter Biodynamic® Farm and Processing Standards.

Bertrand has significant reach a stone’s throw from major hotspots in Herault and Aude: Carcassonne, Narbonne and Montpellier. Esteemed appellations such as Limoux, Corbiers and Minervois are represented by Gérard Bertrand.

wildflowers, blue sky, south of France
South …
Carcassonne, Narbonne, wine, Corbiers, Terrasses du Larzac, Montpellier, Minervois
French food and wine pairings, grilled food and white wine
sud de france wine. Languedoc wine, organic wine

Champagne Paul Launois Announces Single Barrel Champagne Auction


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Sarah and Julien Launois hand-selected the Chardonnay grapes for the ten barrels to be auctioned. Image provided by The Gallavant Group.

Wine enthusiasts who love champagne might enjoy the possibility that Champagne Paul Launois is offering. The champagne house has set aside ten barrels of Chardonnay, that they will auction off on June 14th, 2019. The minimum price for each barrel is 23,400 Euros (about $26,142) for the 216 bottles of champagne that will come from the barrel. That would put the minimum price for each bottle of champagne at least at $121.

Those purchasing a barrel will have the opportunity to work with the champagne house to determine aging and dosage. Aging can take place between three and ten years. The dosage will be determined by the barrel owner’s preferences. 

Although the auction is out of the reach for most wine enthusiasts, collectors, industry professionals and restaurants may …

A Little Effervescence for Mom


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My parents were teetotalers, my father because his father was a drunken lout, my mother because she believed that the merest drop of alcohol meant one was fated to a life in the gutter among cigarette butts and dead pigeons. No wonder I took to drink! But seriously, folks, even though my late mother would not have enjoyed a sip of Champagne or other sparkling wine on her day, in this post I’ll mention several products in those genres that will bring delight to your Mom’s celebration. We have a cava brut rosé from Spain, a pinot noir-dominated sparkler from Alta Langa in Italy, and a majority pinot noir rosé Champagne. In fact, pinot noir could be the sub-theme of this post. In any case, Happy Mother’s Day to all the Moms out there; I hope your enjoy your day, imbibing in moderation, of course.

These sparkling products were samples …

200 Bottles of 1969 Pommard Found in Cellar: ‘They Tasted Great’


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


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French château renovation
The château at Clos de Commaraine in Pommard. Photo Credit: CLOS DE COMMARAINE

Pommard Landmark Clos de la Commaraine Gets A Biodynamic, And Luxury, Renovation

I have a new piece on Forbes that I loved researching. An exciting renovation includes tales of forgotten wine, Thomas Jefferson visits and sheep in the vineyards. Read it all here.

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Clos de Commaraine has a rich history dating to the 12th century. Photo Credit: CLOS DE COMMARAINE

The 2018 harvest marked the next phase of life for Burgundy landmark Clos de la Commaraine. Located in the esteemed Côte-d’Or, the property includes 3.75 hectares of Pommard 1er Cru vines which are fixed in a monopole, now operated by an American couple with plans produce biodynamic wines. The last wine made under the single estate Commaraine name was in 2002 — since then the grapes have been sold to Maison Louis Jadot and produced under …

Vieux Telegraphe ‘La Crau’ 2005


This post is by from Wino sapien


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CNdP. 14.5%. Cork. Cellar.

It’s taken over a month to finally open this half bottle, so long it feels illicit. . .

I’ve been preoccupied with reading, exercise and meditation; I’ve suddenly become less thirsty, I suspect it is a temporary phase, my cellar still beckons. . . but I can’t recall another time in my adult life when I’ve felt so dry. . .

Still stern and formidable, the rigid spine immediately apparent; even on the nose it’s blunt and heavy – raw meat and plum, powerful, dusty, plodding. . . Unforgiving in the mouth, an opening assault of chalky tannin and alcohol, the subsequent sips softer (only) through habituation.

Biodynamic and Organic Stories on Forbes


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


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I’ve had the opportunity to cover several aspects of biodynamic and organic winemaking recently on Forbes. I try to cover biodynamics as much as I can, and I’d like to be sure readers of L’Occasion know these stories are available. Thanks for reading, here or at Forbes, and for sharing your stories with me.

pathway under clouds and blue sky
Photo by David on Pexels.com

Alois Lageder: Biodynamic Winemaking In Italy’s Alto Adige

Alois Lageder is a 54 hectare (135 acre) family winery in the stunning Alto Adige region of Italy. Here, every function is carried out biodynamically. “Quality is the fruit of many individual, mostly small, often unpredictable details. By paying close attention we can recognize these hidden connections,” says a video produced by the family.

Organic Vineyards Protect Bird Populations, And Birds Return The Favor

A recent study out of the Penedès wine region in Catalonia reveals that organic vineyard farming has …

clouds countryside cropland crops

Wine of the Day, No. 481


This post is by from Bigger Than Your Head


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It’s still Pinot Noir Month at BTYH. Let’s move away from California and Oregon, and for this entry in the Wine of the Day series turn to Alsace. The vineyards of Alsace contain only about 9.6 percent pinot noir grapes, most of which go into the sparkling Crémant. Nevertheless, many estates in Alsace produce varietal pinot noirs, made primarily in a spare, lithe fashion. The best I have tried recently is the Emile Beyer Eguisheim Pinot Noir 2015, issuing from an estate founded in 1680 and now operated by Christian Beyer, the 14th generation of the family. Made from certified organic grapes and aged only in used barrels and tanks, the wine offers a transparent medium ruby-garnet hue that shades to an ethereal rim; notes of cloves, red cherry and slightly astringent cherry skin are bolstered by smoke and graphite. To appropriate words from a previous sentence, the Emile …

Working With The Classics: Advice From Women In Champagne


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


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1er Cru, Grand Cru, Premier Cru, Le Mesnil, Sur Oger, Vertus
Grower Champagne, such as this exceptional bottle, from Champagne André Jacquart, is often terroir-driven. Credit: Jill Barth

This has only happened to me once, but because this isn’t the first time I promise this is indeed not a habit. Winophiles publish day rolls around and I don’t have what I need to satisfy my planned post. This happened in 2016, when I didn’t get my Jura wines and actually ended up writing a post from France and still without any wine.

This time, it’s a bit different. I have my wines but couldn’t connect with my sources — two women working in the wine industry in Champagne — in order to tell their story. And I’ve promised, based on the title, to offer some advice direct from these professionals.

Turns out, they are both busy at work.

And I took a week off for the flu.

And, in the end, …

AndreJacquart-people

Mee Godard Passerelle 577 2016


This post is by from Wino sapien


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Like a spinning top – it holds its shape and line only for a moment before losing control. Lush and evocative, a delicate pretty nose – raspberry cream and blue flowers. Quick, tart and dense with signal, it’s only later that it seems to stagger and splutter unflatteringly.

Related.

L’Anglore Tavel 2015


This post is by from Wino sapien


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13%. Grenache et al, presumably. Cork.

2019 has seen a curious inversion of priorities. . . the days I open a bottle are now notable, where once it was the abstemious that were the exception. I credit the dog that bit me four months ago – a chain of events starting with injury and then recovery and a renewed interest in meditation, dharma and exercise has shoved wine to the end of the queue. . .

I still have a stash of cellared wines which I plan on enjoying, but perhaps more sporadically and less obsessively. . .

With a plate of salmon and Hasselbacks – a glass of exemplary Tavel. Medium/pale red; a super nose – pure, light, luminous. Lavender flowers and rhubarb. Playfulness and unity. . . Lush, crunchy, joyous. It seems quite complete and self contained. Well paced, the back end with flesh, texture and energy.

Bellet: Provence’s Urban Wine Appellation


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


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Chateau_de_bellet_4
The vineyards of Château de Bellet. Photo Credit: Château de Bellet

As France’s oldest wine region, Provence is infinitely important to the global history of viticulture. The region was settled by the Phocaeans around 600 BC, and it’s believed that the Greeks were responsible for the dawn of winemaking and grape growing in ancient Provence. These early wines were pale, made in a free-run fashion with a flash maceration.

Provence History and Appellations

By the 2nd century BC, an alliance was formed with the Romans, and evidence of their influence is still felt in modern-day Provence. The Romans began crafting red wines, but rosé still held sway and white and rosé wines were reserved for the aristocracy and clergy.

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Les Antiques, Roman artifacts near St. Rémy-de-Provence. Photo Credit: Jill Barth

Rosé is still closely associated with Provence, yet many consumers connect it to a lifestyle of holiday and free-wheeling. …

Provence Map
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Chateau_de_bellet_2
Chateau_de_bellet_5
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A Year In Provence by Peter Mayle.

Weekend Wine Notes: Nine Robust Reds for Superbowl Snacks


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Oh, sure, you’re thinking, “Hey, F.K., this is America! We drink beer when we watch the Super Bowl!” All right, I understand the issues involved, but even when you’re talking about barbecue nachos, baby-back ribs, Sloppy Joes, prime rib sliders, even certain varieties of chili and quesadillas, a large-framed, robust wine can be as appropriate as beer, though, I confess, not with super-spicy food laced with serranos and such. Anyway, following that premise, I offer nine examples of the sorts of wine you could serve this Sunday while watching two teams neither of which apparently deserve to be there contending on the gridiron of valor. Prices range from a comfortable $14 and $18, good for supplying bottles to crowds of football fans, up to $60. As usual with these Weekend Wine Notes I deliver no elements of technical, geographical or historical data for the sake of quick, …

Discover a Boutique French Winery


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Mazarin 2017 from Clos Guérin

Clos Guérin is located in the Côtes-du-Rhône appellation. The winery and vineyards are located on a plateau that is affected by the famed mistral winds. 

Clos Guérin has a long heritage in the wine growing industry. As far back as the 1800s, the family was growing grapes as well as many farm products including vegetables and fruits such as peaches and figs. During the mid 1900s, they added milk production and poultry to the farm. 

When the agricultural endeavors failed to provide a proper living, the descendants turned to other pursuits including sculpting wood/oak and iron/stainless steel. Many years past and the 4th generation formed a team together agreeing to return to the family’s traditions. The beginning of the foundation of Clos Guérin began in 2013.

Currently Clos Guérin has eight hectares (19.7 acres) of vineyards. The vineyards include the grape varieties: …