Wine of the Day, No. 445


This post is by from Bigger Than Your Head


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Here’s a potion that will warm the cockles of your heart on these chilly eves. By the way, that old expression has nothing to do with “cockles and mussels, alive-alive oh,” but is a popular corruption of the Latin cochleae cordis, for the ventricles of the heart. Anyway, the Dow’s Late Bottled Vintage Port 2012 is a large-framed, robust and supple-silky port that goes down like liquid embers. A quick explanation. Vintage Port, the real, rare and expensive stuff, rests two or three years in wood and then is bottled in its fiery, tannic youth to develop and mature over decades of slumber. LBV ages as long as four to six years after harvest in barrel, so by the time it’s bottled, the wine has already matured to a drinkable state. LBVs are priced more reasonably that true Vintage Ports. Grapes for Dow’s Late Bottled Vintage Port 2012 derive …

Weekend Wine Notes: Six Ports for Dear Old Dad


This post is by from Bigger Than Your Head


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On Mother’s Day, I wrote about Champagne. For Father’s Day, the subject is Port. Who gets the better deal is up to you to decide, if such a decision is even necessary. Personally, I’ll take Champagne before dinner and Port after.

Port, made in Portugal’s Douro Valley, is a fortified wine, that is, fermentation is stopped with the addition of brandy or neutral grape spirits to the tanks or vats, leaving the wine with some (usually well-balanced) sweetness and an alcohol content of 19 or 20 percent. Young ports, especially fledgling vintage ports, can be powerful, fiery and tannic; old tawny ports lean toward mellow and ethereal. Port wines occur in many categories, some types fairly arcane, but the principle kinds are Ruby, Reserve, Late-Bottled Vintage, Vintage Port and Tawny. Ruby Ports are the youngest, the freshest and most fruity, typically aged in vats for two or three years. Reserve …

Patience Becomes Virtue (About 40 Years Of Vintage Port)


This post is by from 1 Wine Dude


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Vintage Port tasting 2018 NYC

“I hate waiting…”

So… I promised a follow-up to that 2016 Vintage Port preview, and since I’m a man(-child) of my word, here ’tis!

The central theme of my `16 VP roundup was that we all need to slow the f*ck down and accept the fact that Vintage Port not only takes a looooooong time to come around, and that a) many of us might be dead before newly-released VPs are fully developed, but we should buy them for future generations, and b) your patience regarding waiting on the slow maturation of VP will be well rewarded.

It’s time for us to get to the “b)” part, as we take a trip back through roughly thirty years of time, beginning with 2007 (when we were lamenting the state of our 401k balances) and ending with 1980 (when we were wearing JAMs, listening to disco, and some of you were …

Fonseca 20017 & Croft 2003
Noval 1994
Taylor Fladgate 1985
Graham's 1983 & Dow's 1980

Day 13: Our Last Day of the Portugal Wine Tour


This post is by from Wine Trail Traveler LLC


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Although our last day in Portugal was jam-packed full of activities; we enjoyed every minute of it. After another terrific breakfast at The Yeatman hotel, we met with Beatriz Machado, wine director and Richard Bowden, marketing director for the hotel.

 

 

View of Porto from The Yeatman

The Yeatman hotel

Spa at The Yeatman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This very enjoyable meeting was followed with a visit to the IVDP (Instituto Do Vinho Do Porto) where we had an extended visit to the pristine laboratories where the IVDP wines are tested to be sure they meet the strict regulations of IVDP.

 

IVDP

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IVDP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our next stops were two port houses; Porto Cruz and Ferreira. Wine enthusiasts will want to consider visiting both of these port houses while in Portugal. Porto Cruz uses “The Woman in Black” as …

Day 12: Portugal Wine Tour


This post is by from Wine Trail Traveler LLC


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We extended our winery tour of Portugal’s wine region for a couple extra days. On the twelfth day of our our visit to Portugal, we visited three port lodges across the Douro River from Porto.

Our  first visit was to the Offley port house in Vila Nova de Gaia across the Douro River. Offley was started by William Offley in 1737. His nephew, Joseph James Forrester gained fame for his extensive survey of the Douro and the vineyards.

 

Offley port house

Have you tried Offley’s White Port yet?

Offley’s port tasting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our next visit was to Taylor Fladgate. The port lodge, established in 1692, is one of Portugal’s oldest port lodges. Visitors to the Taylor Fladgate port house can enjoy a long, self-guided tour and a tasting port. Over the many years, four families have been involved with the port house including: Bearsley, …

8th Day: Portugal


This post is by from Wine Trail Traveler LLC


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Our tour of Portugal’s wine regions continued on our eighth day with visits to two quintas in the Douro Valley. At Quinta do Portal, we had the opportunity to see a demonstration of a Port bottle opened with a tong. During our tour we learned that older ports tend to have the corks sealed with sugar from the ports, increasing the likelihood of the corks falling apart as they are removed from the bottle. Using iron tongs and a special technique, the neck of the bottle is cut. The technique seems simple enough, but would you want to use it with a bottle of old Port in your cellar? At our demonstration, we were asked would we rather use the tongs on an old Port or saber a bottle of Champagne? How would you answer?

Portal

Porta tongs

Portal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For  our visit to …

When Its Cold Outside Reach for Port – Here’s Two from Warre’s and Graham’s


This post is by Todd Godbout from WineCompass


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This winter the buzzword appears to be bomb cyclone, which replaced polar vortex, which replaced Alberta Clipper, which sometime in the past replaced the simple cold front of my youth. Regardless of these marketing weather gimmicks, when its cold I reach for Port – a fortified wine produced from grapes grown and processed in the Portuguese Douro demarcation and fortified with neutral grape spirit.

There are over a hundred sanctioned grape varieties eligible for Port, but in general, expect the use of these five: Tinta Barroca, Tinta Cão, Tinta Roriz (Tempranillo), Touriga Francesa, and Touriga Nacional. There are also several categories of Port: White, Tawny, Ruby, Reserve, and Vintage. (See The Wine Coach for specifics.) Aged tawnies come in ten year increments that reflect a port house’s style and not a minimum, maximum, or average age. Thus a 10-year-old or 20-year-old Tawny port is a taste …

The Plurality of Portuguese Wine


This post is by Jill Barth from L'OCCASION


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Earlier this year I had the opportunity to write about The Douro Boys. This is a group of winemakers from five quintas (the Portuguese term for wine estate) that have put their energy together to make wine drinkers more aware of the variety of wine coming out of their UNESCO-recognized region.

“Together, they’re putting the wine-drinking world on notice about the excellent unfortified, dry wines of Portugal and the Douro Valley in particular.”

Map of Wine, Portuguese Wine Map, DOC Wine,
Courtesy: Wines of Portugal

Unfortified wines are, essentially, the wines we know as wine – while fortified wines are what we know as Port. Wine enthusiasts are aware of the value, diversity and tastes of unfortified wines from Portugal, but not everyone has enjoyed their share, or at least has had a lot of it. But times are changing and wines coming out of Portugal suit all manner of tastes from all manner of growing environments.

Portuguese vineyards, Porto, Six Grapes Port

A Trio of Portuguese Reserve Ports from Symington Family Estates


This post is by Todd Godbout from WineCompass


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Portuguese Port is rather redundant since thanks to the European Union Protected Designation of Origin guidelines most wine labeled as “Port” or “Porto” must be a fortified wine produced exclusively in the Douro region in the northern provinces of Portugal. This may not always be the case outside of Europe, but most countries are accepting the Portuguese Protected designation of origin.

 Port wine is a classic style — produced from grown and processed in the Douro demarcation and fortified with neutral grape spirit. There are over a hundred sanctioned grape varieties eligible for Port, but in general, expect the use of these five: Tinta Barroca, Tinta Cão, Tinta Roriz (Tempranillo), Touriga Francesa, and Touriga Nacional. There are also several categories of Port: White, Tawny, Ruby, Reserve, and Vintage.  (See The Wine Coach for specifics.)  Ruby Ports are aged in large vats for two to three years before bottling …

Port Fudge Brownies Recipe


This post is by from Wine Trail Traveler LLC


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Messina Hof Winery & Resort, Bryan, TX

Messina Hof Winery & Resort in Bryan, Texas makes a great Port. This special port, Papa Paul Port Private Reserve Double Barrel 2010,  is produced with the Lenoir grape  It’s yummy. The Port offered fruity notes of raisins and plums. It had 8% residual sugar, a medium  sweet wine.

For Valentine’s Day or any day of the year, try the Messina Hof Port with this yummy recipe provided by Merrill Bonarrigo, who founded the winery with her husband Paul.

Harvesting Lenoir grapes at Messina Hof Winery

Port Fudge Brownie Recipe

Ingredients

4 ounces (1/2 cup) bittersweet chocolate chips
1 stick of butter, cut into pieces
1/4 cup Messina Hof Port
2 large eggs
2/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup flour
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions

Grab your ingredients, an 8×8 pan and a large mixing bowl …

Ramos Pinto LBV 2011 + Some Wine Gadgets


This post is by from Drinking Outside The Box


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Ramos Pinto LBV Port 2011, Douro, Portugal (~£19 widely available) LBV is supposed to be ready to drink on release, but this is a bit of a pup, and seems to be built to survive another decade or more. Dark, young and juicy, packed with blackberry, blackcurrant and damson flavours, with a herby, dusty warmth […]

Do you like your white port blended or unblended?


This post is by from Drinking Outside The Box


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It’s not as prominent as red port, but white port still merits attention. But should you drink it neat or with additions? Mixed messages from these two wines… PORT 1 Cálem White & Dry Port NV, Douro, Portugal (£12.90 Amathus Drinks) By itself: Quite weighty, with an alcoholic kick to the sweet heady crystallied pineapple and orange […]

Portuguese Dessert Recipe: Pão-de-Ló


This post is by Gabriella Opaz from Catavino


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pao de lo - Portuguese dessertThere are several ways to learn about a country and its people. While some choose to expand their knowledge through books, others decide to visit in person. I was zealous and did both before and since moving to Portugal, but I believe the base of this country rests in its food culture. With a loaf of bread you can see the history of a simple, warm, enduring people. In a soup the love for family is obvious. And the ingenious use of ingredients show that anything can become something wonderful.

This is why I love to dive into the old recipes of Portugal. Making connections between ingredients, their purpose in the dish and then the sudden realization of how and why it came to be is one of my favorite ways to understand this culture better. Essentially, I’m all about learning the classics and enjoy the challenge of not only …

pao de lo ingredients

The United Grapes of America – Nebraska’s Mac’s Creek Vineyards & Winery Poncu


This post is by Todd M. Godbout from WineCompass


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Mac’s Creek Vineyards & Winery came through with another interesting wine at the annual Wine America Congressional Tasting. This was their Poncu ($25) port styled wine. The weather is too extreme in the Cornhusker state for vinifera grapes so Mac’s Creek specializes in cold hardy hybrids, many created at the University of Minnesota such as Edelweiss, LaCrescent, and Frontenac.

The United Grapes of America
StarChefs.com: The United Grapes of America

Founder Max McFarland explained how the Poncu is made.  They ferment Frontenac and then send the wine to a distillery where it is distilled into grape brandy. The winery then purchases the brandy, ages it in oak barrels, and then use it to fortify batches of semi-dry Frontenac. As you can see, Frontenac all the way.  The label and name honors the McFarland Family cattle brand and Max’s father Dale “Bud” McFarland. Bud enjoyed Stetson hats and Poncu is what 3rd …

Quinta Nova Vintage Port 2013, Portugal


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Quinta Nova Vintage Port 2013, Portugal (N/A in the UK) Has the heady aromas of a port quinta at vintage time, but while the essence of blackberry essence and liquorice ooze from the glass, I miss the perfumed notes, and there’s also a slightly green edge to the tannin. Good but not great. S-

Quinta do Noval turns 300 – A tasting with Christian Seely


This post is by from Dr Vino's wine blog


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Who cares about port? I scale waist-high snow mounds and leap slush puddles to attend a tasting of Noval ports yesterday. It was well worth it. Christian Seely (left) with Michael Quinttus of Vintus, who imports the wines.

Christian Seely, the erudite and affable managing director of Quinta do Noval since 1993 (and head of AXA Millesimes), flew into New York to lead a tasting at the new tasting spot, Journée. Available for the assembled scribes were three incredible groups of wines: Colheitas, vintage, and the Nacional, a vintage bottling from a select parcel of old, ungrafted vines that almost always makes the most coveted wines from Noval and from the region. The Quinta

celebrated its 300th anniversary last year, so all the more reason to break out some old stuff.

Seely underscored the importance of terroir to the wines since, unlike most other houses, Noval sources their fruit exclusively …

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